The Importance of Being Oscar

Critics

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63 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

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Reviews: 1

“You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit.” -Oscar Wilde

Fresh off the success of their first show this year, "Macbeth: His Story Her Tragedy," Fearless Imp Entertainment returns to the stage this June at the annual Hollywood Fringe Festival.  Inspired by an award-winning short play, “The Importance Of Being Oscar” follows the legendary playwright and poet, Oscar Wilde, through the last years of his life. Finally released from prison, Oscar, portrayed by Richard Abraham, tries to reclaim his life. He has three visitors during his final days, his friend, portrayed by Richard Lucas, his estranged wife, portrayed by Cyanne McClairian, and finally one of his fictional creations, portrayed by Patrick Censoplano. They discuss love, loss, mistakes and morality (or lack thereof).  Sometimes whimsical and sometimes heartbreaking, “The Importance Of Being Oscar” is a beautiful tribute to an icon of the world of theatre, liberally laced with his very own witticisms and quotes.  Expertly written by Brandie June and directed by Fearless Imp Entertainment producer Matthew Martin, "Oscar" makes its world premiere at this year's Hollywood Fringe Festival.

“Author and creation have a conversation, immortal character and dying human man, about life and art and desire. Frankly, the whole thing proved so well-written I wanted a longer play.” –Review from The World Through Night-Tinted Glasses of the original short play, A Picture of Oscar Wilde.

Reviews

The Importance of Being Oscar is demonstrative of a particular difficulty in writing plays, scripts or novels dealing with historical personages; the author must always master them.

sweet - Ernest Kearney - www.thetvolution.com - ...read full review


While I enjoyed Richard Abraham's portrayal of Oscar Wilde, that wasn't enough for me to enjoy the show as a whole. The Importance of Being Oscar presents Oscar Wilde post-jail in three vignettes where he meets with a colleague, his estranged wife and his fictional character Dorian Gray. These encounters occur in three different years according to the program. However, the direction doesn't make this clear, leaving the play to feel as if Wilde has one really long emotionally packed afternoon. There are also no breaks for Wilde or the audience. Bad news and poor tidings pile one on top of the other with nothing lighthearted to break them up for even a moment, leaving a depressive cloud over the whole affair.

sour - Kat Michels - See It Or Skip It LA - ...read full review


A captivating look at the final tragic post prison years of Oscar Wilde's life. The play heavily uses actual quotes from Wilde, and his timeless wit is just as clever and sometimes profound now, as it ever was. All of the actors inhabit their roles very capably. The actor who plays Wilde is entirely believable as the world's most clever man who has been beaten down by the world and whose options are running out. The actor who plays Dorian captures the dapper and dangerous perfection of perhaps Wilde's ultimate creation. Serving a shot of absinthe at the start is a very nice touch as well. Only the final line of the play didn't make sense to me. There's a better way to end it.

sweet - David Lucarelli


"The Importance of Being Oscar" is literate, funny, interesting, and lively. Author Brandie June deftly uses several of Wilde's best bon mots, and throws in a few of her own. It still has some rough edges, but in brief compass, it explores the many difficulties — and discovers the real importance — of being Oscar. It seems clear that this story wants to grow into a full-length work. I can't wait to see what June does with it.

sweet - Mark Hein - ...read full review


It is inspired when playwright June takes dramatic license and has a fevered Wilde on his death bed in 1900 visited by a figment of his imagination, his own immortal creation Dorian Gray (Patrick Censoplano in the play's most vibrant characterization).

sweet-sour - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


The Importance of Being Oscar is demonstrative of a particular difficulty in writing plays, scripts or novels dealing with historical personages; the author must always master them.

sweet - Ernest Kearney - www.thetvolution.com - ...read full review


While I enjoyed Richard Abraham's portrayal of Oscar Wilde, that wasn't enough for me to enjoy the show as a whole. The Importance of Being Oscar presents Oscar Wilde post-jail in three vignettes where he meets with a colleague, his estranged wife and his fictional character Dorian Gray. These encounters occur in three different years according to the program. However, the direction doesn't make this clear, leaving the play to feel as if Wilde has one really long emotionally packed afternoon. There are also no breaks for Wilde or the audience. Bad news and poor tidings pile one on top of the other with nothing lighthearted to break them up for even a moment, leaving a depressive cloud over the whole affair.

sour - Kat Michels - See It Or Skip It LA - ...read full review


"The Importance of Being Oscar" is literate, funny, interesting, and lively. Author Brandie June deftly uses several of Wilde's best bon mots, and throws in a few of her own. It still has some rough edges, but in brief compass, it explores the many difficulties — and discovers the real importance — of being Oscar. It seems clear that this story wants to grow into a full-length work. I can't wait to see what June does with it.

sweet - Mark Hein - ...read full review


It is inspired when playwright June takes dramatic license and has a fevered Wilde on his death bed in 1900 visited by a figment of his imagination, his own immortal creation Dorian Gray (Patrick Censoplano in the play's most vibrant characterization).

sweet-sour - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


A captivating look at the final tragic post prison years of Oscar Wilde's life. The play heavily uses actual quotes from Wilde, and his timeless wit is just as clever and sometimes profound now, as it ever was. All of the actors inhabit their roles very capably. The actor who plays Wilde is entirely believable as the world's most clever man who has been beaten down by the world and whose options are running out. The actor who plays Dorian captures the dapper and dangerous perfection of perhaps Wilde's ultimate creation. Serving a shot of absinthe at the start is a very nice touch as well. Only the final line of the play didn't make sense to me. There's a better way to end it.

sweet - David Lucarelli