Somewhere in the Middle

Critics

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100 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

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Reviews: 0

Written and Directed by Gary Lamb  Crown City Theatre Presents “Somewhere in the Middle (or, guess who's coming to Passover)”which takes place in Middle America in the Midwest, about a Middle Class, fairly functional, Judeo-Christian family.  It's a funny and heartwarming comic-drama about prejudices and religious beliefs, which are brought to the forefront when the eldest over-achieving child (Sarah) comes home for the Passover/Easter holiday dressed in Muslim garb.  Her Middle-aged Mother (Lauren) and her Grandmother (Roz) are taken aback, while her smart-ass younger brother (Adam) loves the idea that he can now become the number one child in his parent's eyes.  Her Father (David) is concerned that his daughter's religious studies class is making her question her Jewish heritage.  But is this a rouse to lighten the impact of bringing home her college boyfriend?  The conversation about getting Roz to move into a retirement community and back into “the real world” after having lost her husband a year ago, takes a back seat to the new guest of honor.  With a nod to “Guess Who's Coming To Dinner” when the boyfriend (Jamal) shows up discussions get a little heated and nothing is off-limits. From the Midwest to the Middle East is there really any one-sided truth or does the truth live somewhere in the middle.

Reviews

As the play opens, the family is waiting for daughter Sarah (Julie Lanctot) to return home from Stanford to join them for the Passover holiday.Eventually Sarah reveals that she has invited her friend Jamal to join them for the Passover holiday. The family is happy to include him, but when he arrives they are startled to discover that he is black.Even though the play is set in 2007, the familiar arguments voiced by David, Jamal, and Sarah are no closer to being resolved than they ever were.

sweet - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


This thought and discussion-provoking play will certainly resonant with anyone raised in a family where their parents' religious beliefs and prejudices clashed with their own, with the younger generation usually taking a more liberal view on the mixing of religions and races when it comes to dating and marriage.

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


Nice dialogue and fun middle class characters make this enjoyable in spite of an overly sugar-coated ending.

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


“…a humorously entertaining play with thought-provoking undertones and issues. Written BEAUTIFULLY by Gary Lamb, borrowing from his own family memories, he also directs the play with HEARTFELT EMOTION. The journey for the audience was soul searching and relatable, as each of us consider our own family histories. Loaded with laughs, nostalgia and wisdom, his script looks at family dynamics from all sides. …STRONG PERFORMANCES… The whole shebang is a ton of fun and well performed by all! The colorful set and props, designed with DETAILED BRILLIANCE by Joanne McGee, are visually awe-inspiring! Amanda Walter (Costume Design) and Zad Potter (Light Design) also set the mood artfully. This is an in-depth family story that held my interest from the very first moment. Do see it!” -Tolucan Times

sweet - Pat Taylor - Tolucan Times - ...read full review


The play echoed quite a bit with me, which is the direct result of the power of not only the fine actors but of the words they spoke. It is all in the writing as they say. In short, I loved it!!

sweet - Samantha Simmonds-Ronceros - ...read full review


I approached Somewhere in the Middle (or guess who's coming for Passover) with some trepidation, if only for its rather unwieldy title. I need not have fretted. The latest from Crown City may not win a Pulitzer, but it's a crowd-pleasing winner in its own sweet, funny, conversation-starting way.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


As the play opens, the family is waiting for daughter Sarah (Julie Lanctot) to return home from Stanford to join them for the Passover holiday.Eventually Sarah reveals that she has invited her friend Jamal to join them for the Passover holiday. The family is happy to include him, but when he arrives they are startled to discover that he is black.Even though the play is set in 2007, the familiar arguments voiced by David, Jamal, and Sarah are no closer to being resolved than they ever were.

sweet - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


This thought and discussion-provoking play will certainly resonant with anyone raised in a family where their parents' religious beliefs and prejudices clashed with their own, with the younger generation usually taking a more liberal view on the mixing of religions and races when it comes to dating and marriage.

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


Nice dialogue and fun middle class characters make this enjoyable in spite of an overly sugar-coated ending.

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


“…a humorously entertaining play with thought-provoking undertones and issues. Written BEAUTIFULLY by Gary Lamb, borrowing from his own family memories, he also directs the play with HEARTFELT EMOTION. The journey for the audience was soul searching and relatable, as each of us consider our own family histories. Loaded with laughs, nostalgia and wisdom, his script looks at family dynamics from all sides. …STRONG PERFORMANCES… The whole shebang is a ton of fun and well performed by all! The colorful set and props, designed with DETAILED BRILLIANCE by Joanne McGee, are visually awe-inspiring! Amanda Walter (Costume Design) and Zad Potter (Light Design) also set the mood artfully. This is an in-depth family story that held my interest from the very first moment. Do see it!” -Tolucan Times

sweet - Pat Taylor - Tolucan Times - ...read full review


The play echoed quite a bit with me, which is the direct result of the power of not only the fine actors but of the words they spoke. It is all in the writing as they say. In short, I loved it!!

sweet - Samantha Simmonds-Ronceros - ...read full review


I approached Somewhere in the Middle (or guess who's coming for Passover) with some trepidation, if only for its rather unwieldy title. I need not have fretted. The latest from Crown City may not win a Pulitzer, but it's a crowd-pleasing winner in its own sweet, funny, conversation-starting way.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review