Lady LiberTease

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Kirsten is an educator and theatre director. She’s happily married with two kids. When Hillary Clinton loses the 2016 election to Donald J. Trump, Kirsten is compelled to contemplate the world in which her kids will grow up. It spurs her to activism.

As a point of inspiration, she conjures up the goddess Columbia, an original, female, personifying symbol of America (much as France is personified by Marianne and the United Kingdom is personified by Britannia). Although largely forgotten today, except as the logo of a motion picture studio, Columbia was a powerful symbol of America in the first 150 years of its existence, of a free country with liberty and justice for all. When Kirsten takes a deeper dive into history, however, she discovers that the image of Columbia has been subverted, for example, when it was used to promote the white supremacist doctrine of Manifest Destiny, forcibly removing American Indians from their ancestral lands; and, sixty years later, to promote the agenda of the Ku Klux Klan.

Kirsten may have to look at the history of earlier generations of her own family to find out whether they were involved in an unsavory chapter of American history. She’s aware of her own privilege ,but wants to participate in creating a better world for her family and her community. How does she accomplish that without falling into the trap of becoming the White Savior? She may have to look inside, to expunge herself of her own unexamined racial biases and misogyny.

So, in the end, is Columbia our Lady Liberty, or is she just a Lady LiberTease?
Written and performed by Kirsten Laurel Caplan. Directed and developed by Jessica Lynn Johnson. Produced by Living Up to Your Laurels and Soaring Solo Studios.

Reviews

Lady LiberTease is about the personal fallout of Trumpelstilskin's election to a California drama teacher who is also a wife and mother--one who felt (as so many did) profound shock not only that this man (of all people) was elected President, but that the Republican Party swept the into control of both houses of Congress. She had been desperately hoping in November 2016 to see the first woman President of the United States, that (as she put it) her ceiling would be her children's floor.
In her emotional tumult, she accidentally summons Columbia, the little remembered "Goddess of Liberty" invented by the Founding Fathers to serve as an icon of unity. Columbia is the statue of freedom atop the Capitol Dome in Washington DC, as well as the model of the Statue of Liberty, and in fact is the source of the name of the District of Columbia. So begins a journey into the history of the United States, with all the hopes one might imagine, but (more importantly) the broken (or at least unfulfilled) promises.
More importantly, this is Kirsten's deeply uncomfortable journey through an even more troubling set of truths--exactly what she can do about all this, and how that involves recognizing when she (however innocently) contributes to it.
This show has a lot of passion and theatricality, with more than a few dashes of mythology which is absolutely my jam.
But to be honest it feels more like a very entertaining lecture than a tale of personal revelation, which is clearly what it is intended to be. Which by no stretch makes this solo show bad, only less than it could be. It pulls its dramatic punch, so the punch lands with less impact than I think was intended.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Lady LiberTease is about the personal fallout of Trumpelstilskin's election to a California drama teacher who is also a wife and mother--one who felt (as so many did) profound shock not only that this man (of all people) was elected President, but that the Republican Party swept the into control of both houses of Congress. She had been desperately hoping in November 2016 to see the first woman President of the United States, that (as she put it) her ceiling would be her children's floor.
In her emotional tumult, she accidentally summons Columbia, the little remembered "Goddess of Liberty" invented by the Founding Fathers to serve as an icon of unity. Columbia is the statue of freedom atop the Capitol Dome in Washington DC, as well as the model of the Statue of Liberty, and in fact is the source of the name of the District of Columbia. So begins a journey into the history of the United States, with all the hopes one might imagine, but (more importantly) the broken (or at least unfulfilled) promises.
More importantly, this is Kirsten's deeply uncomfortable journey through an even more troubling set of truths--exactly what she can do about all this, and how that involves recognizing when she (however innocently) contributes to it.
This show has a lot of passion and theatricality, with more than a few dashes of mythology which is absolutely my jam.
But to be honest it feels more like a very entertaining lecture than a tale of personal revelation, which is clearly what it is intended to be. Which by no stretch makes this solo show bad, only less than it could be. It pulls its dramatic punch, so the punch lands with less impact than I think was intended.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review