Aubergine

Critics

LemonMeter

92 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Sometimes a meal is more than just food. A man shares a bowl of berries and a young woman falls in love. A mother meticulously prepares her son’s favorite dish to keep him from leaving home. And a Korean-American son cooks soup for his ailing father to say what words cannot. The perfect bite transcends time and cultural differences in this poetic tale of love, loss and healing by the author of The Language Archive and Office Hour. Recommended for ages 14 and above

Reviews

From The Winchester House to Durango to The Language Archive to Office Hour (the latter two of which world premiered at South Coast Rep), Julia Cho has never failed to impress this reviewer, and her latest is no exception. Aubergine is as powerful, poignant, and soul-enriching a play as you’ll see all year.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Under Ms. Peterson’s direction, these scenes are skillful and affecting, cruel and kind. There are wordless pleasures here, too, like the way Ray’s uncle kneels at his brother’s bedside or how Mr. Kim’s Ray handles a turtle, destined for the soup pot.

sweet-sour - Chris Daniels - The Show Report - ...read full review


Ultimately poignant and movingly poetic despite its often sluggish machinations, AUBERGINE is another accomplished drama from such a talented voice in theater, and another excellent production from her champions at South Coast Repertory.

sweet - Michael Quintos - Broadway World - ...read full review


The play, sensitively directed by Lisa Peterson at South Coast Repertory, gives all the characters a chance to share familial memories of food.

...something else comes through in “Aubergine” — history, familial and cultural — served with the reverent love of a ritual meal.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


If talking and reading about food, watching shows about it, and, of course, eating it, is your great passion, you will probably love Julia Cho’s play Aubergine.

However, if your take on food is more like Thoreau’s—food is fuel, and you eat to survive—you may also love it. Because while the preparation and consuming of food plays a big part in Cho’s beautifully written work, it’s as much about food as it is the Korean American characters at its center. Which is everything. And nothing.

sweet - Joel Beers - OC Weekly - ...read full review


Cho is a master of words and silences whose spare, poetic writing makes precise use of both and doesn’t waste a morsel of either.

Lisa Peterson works so well with the offbeat sensibilities of Culture Clash it comes as something of a surprise her direction of this play is so perfectly in tune with Cho, who could not be more different...

All told “Aubergine” resembles an exquisite meal prepared by a great chef, not unlike one depicted in the drama. It’s the kind of play SCR made its reputation on, the sort that will stick to the ribs of the devoted theatregoer who maintains a steady diet of plays, to obtain the kind of experience they simply can’t get from movies—even the best ones.

sweet - Jordan Young - JordanRYoung - ...read full review


From The Winchester House to Durango to The Language Archive to Office Hour (the latter two of which world premiered at South Coast Rep), Julia Cho has never failed to impress this reviewer, and her latest is no exception. Aubergine is as powerful, poignant, and soul-enriching a play as you’ll see all year.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Under Ms. Peterson’s direction, these scenes are skillful and affecting, cruel and kind. There are wordless pleasures here, too, like the way Ray’s uncle kneels at his brother’s bedside or how Mr. Kim’s Ray handles a turtle, destined for the soup pot.

sweet-sour - Chris Daniels - The Show Report - ...read full review


Ultimately poignant and movingly poetic despite its often sluggish machinations, AUBERGINE is another accomplished drama from such a talented voice in theater, and another excellent production from her champions at South Coast Repertory.

sweet - Michael Quintos - Broadway World - ...read full review


The play, sensitively directed by Lisa Peterson at South Coast Repertory, gives all the characters a chance to share familial memories of food.

...something else comes through in “Aubergine” — history, familial and cultural — served with the reverent love of a ritual meal.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


If talking and reading about food, watching shows about it, and, of course, eating it, is your great passion, you will probably love Julia Cho’s play Aubergine.

However, if your take on food is more like Thoreau’s—food is fuel, and you eat to survive—you may also love it. Because while the preparation and consuming of food plays a big part in Cho’s beautifully written work, it’s as much about food as it is the Korean American characters at its center. Which is everything. And nothing.

sweet - Joel Beers - OC Weekly - ...read full review


Cho is a master of words and silences whose spare, poetic writing makes precise use of both and doesn’t waste a morsel of either.

Lisa Peterson works so well with the offbeat sensibilities of Culture Clash it comes as something of a surprise her direction of this play is so perfectly in tune with Cho, who could not be more different...

All told “Aubergine” resembles an exquisite meal prepared by a great chef, not unlike one depicted in the drama. It’s the kind of play SCR made its reputation on, the sort that will stick to the ribs of the devoted theatregoer who maintains a steady diet of plays, to obtain the kind of experience they simply can’t get from movies—even the best ones.

sweet - Jordan Young - JordanRYoung - ...read full review