AS WE BABBLE ON

Critics

LemonMeter

67 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

As We Babble On explores the pursuit of success, its costs, and whether the whole adulting thing is ever going to happen. Benji, a first-generation Asian American comic book artist, struggles in New York City when his dreams are pulled from under him and an ex-boyfriend resurfaces. As the unconventional path of his bestie Sheila takes a left turn, and his half-sister Laura unexpectedly finds herself on the fast track to success, each begins to unravel. 

Reviews

It is a dramedy without a remedy. Thus, Babble's rabble remains stuck in a bubble – albeit an amusing one with some trendsetting 21st century stagecraft.

sweet-sour - Ed Rampell - Hollywood Progressive - ...read full review


The most entertaining and promising original play I've seen at East West Players since Washer/Dryer debuted three years ago, As We Babble On concludes EWP's 52nd season with sizzle and sass. 52 years old has rarely seemed so young.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


I like when the sunshine punches through the gray,” he told angryasianman.com. AS WE BABBLE ON is exactly that. It presents the struggles of young adults to achieve their dreams in a difficult economy, but with a good dose of humor added to it.

sweet - Dena Burroughs - The Fume of Sights - ...read full review


East West Players proves itself a masterful company at getting grants to develop new works, but I'll never understand how Nathan Ramos's As We Babble On won an EWP playwriting competition. In preparation for the mid-21st century when minorities are predicted to be the majority in the U.S., it's obviously more important right now to have characters who are minorities rather than minority characters inside a good story (we don't even get backstory on siblings Benji and Laura). Even with some funny moments and good points, it's silly, sloppy, sophomoric, and shallow.

sour - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


A group of friends struggles with moving up and on, into the adult stages of life, full of uncertainties about who they are, what they want, and how they fit in. Contemporary issues brought to light in an entertaining way. Convincing and committed work by the actors.

sweet - denzil meyers


East West Players, in association with the Los Angeles LGBT Center, has another entertaining hit on their hands with the world premiere of playwright Nathan Ramos' AS WE BABBLE ON. Ramos' very clever, contemporary script (lots of screen grabs of texting and emojis) weaves a sometimes funny, sometimes heart-warming, always real tale of Benji, a gay Asian-American comic book artist and his close family of friends. A hundred minutes go by without you even realizing it!

sweet - Gil Kaan - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Each of them suffers a certain degree of mistreatment and racist discrimination, with the possible exception of Orson, whose wealth shields him. Notwithstanding the occasional outburst against the rich, the characters are willing to make such compromises as will allow them greater access to society's rewards, and I appreciated that honesty on the playwright's part. Yet that very fact begs the question, what are we buying into, and what is the price? The success model recapitulates the every-person-for-themselves ideology of dog-eats-dog individualism, with a strong dash of privilege thrown in owing to Orson's newly stirred philanthropic generosity (a tax write-off, of course). Ramos's fantasy does not account for the reality that not everyone, however many times the American ethos repeats it, is a millionaire in training. As America moves toward ever greater multi-ethnic nationality, will more democratic racial and gender representation in the halls of success do anything to alter the hardening class divide? That will be the challenge for the indebted Millennials. Given the rate of automation, the rise of the service economy, and the domination of finance in the marketplace, it will take much more than fair “representation” to make America a happy place for all its inhabitants. And that will indeed be “hard AF.”

sweet-sour - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


It is a dramedy without a remedy. Thus, Babble's rabble remains stuck in a bubble – albeit an amusing one with some trendsetting 21st century stagecraft.

sweet-sour - Ed Rampell - Hollywood Progressive - ...read full review


The most entertaining and promising original play I've seen at East West Players since Washer/Dryer debuted three years ago, As We Babble On concludes EWP's 52nd season with sizzle and sass. 52 years old has rarely seemed so young.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


I like when the sunshine punches through the gray,” he told angryasianman.com. AS WE BABBLE ON is exactly that. It presents the struggles of young adults to achieve their dreams in a difficult economy, but with a good dose of humor added to it.

sweet - Dena Burroughs - The Fume of Sights - ...read full review


East West Players proves itself a masterful company at getting grants to develop new works, but I'll never understand how Nathan Ramos's As We Babble On won an EWP playwriting competition. In preparation for the mid-21st century when minorities are predicted to be the majority in the U.S., it's obviously more important right now to have characters who are minorities rather than minority characters inside a good story (we don't even get backstory on siblings Benji and Laura). Even with some funny moments and good points, it's silly, sloppy, sophomoric, and shallow.

sour - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


East West Players, in association with the Los Angeles LGBT Center, has another entertaining hit on their hands with the world premiere of playwright Nathan Ramos' AS WE BABBLE ON. Ramos' very clever, contemporary script (lots of screen grabs of texting and emojis) weaves a sometimes funny, sometimes heart-warming, always real tale of Benji, a gay Asian-American comic book artist and his close family of friends. A hundred minutes go by without you even realizing it!

sweet - Gil Kaan - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Each of them suffers a certain degree of mistreatment and racist discrimination, with the possible exception of Orson, whose wealth shields him. Notwithstanding the occasional outburst against the rich, the characters are willing to make such compromises as will allow them greater access to society's rewards, and I appreciated that honesty on the playwright's part. Yet that very fact begs the question, what are we buying into, and what is the price? The success model recapitulates the every-person-for-themselves ideology of dog-eats-dog individualism, with a strong dash of privilege thrown in owing to Orson's newly stirred philanthropic generosity (a tax write-off, of course). Ramos's fantasy does not account for the reality that not everyone, however many times the American ethos repeats it, is a millionaire in training. As America moves toward ever greater multi-ethnic nationality, will more democratic racial and gender representation in the halls of success do anything to alter the hardening class divide? That will be the challenge for the indebted Millennials. Given the rate of automation, the rise of the service economy, and the domination of finance in the marketplace, it will take much more than fair “representation” to make America a happy place for all its inhabitants. And that will indeed be “hard AF.”

sweet-sour - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


A group of friends struggles with moving up and on, into the adult stages of life, full of uncertainties about who they are, what they want, and how they fit in. Contemporary issues brought to light in an entertaining way. Convincing and committed work by the actors.

sweet - denzil meyers