A Delicate Ship

Critics

LemonMeter

73 %

Reviews: 11

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

A haunting love triangle triggers an unexpected chain of events in this poetic play. In the early stages of a new relationship, Sarah and Sam are lovers happily discovering each other. Sarah and Nate know everything about each other, best of friends since childhood and Maybe something more. But when Nate shows up unannounced on Sarah's doorstep, she's left questioning what and who she wants in this humorous and heartbreaking look at love, memory, and the decisions that alter the course of our lives. A DELICATE SHIP will preview on Saturday, January 13 at 8pm; Sunday, January 14 at 2pm; Tuesday, January 16 at 8pm; Wednesday, January 17 at 8pm; Thursday, January 18 at 8pm and will open on Friday, January 19 at 8pm and run through Sunday, March 11 at the Road Theatre on Magnolia, located in The NoHo Senior Arts Colony, 10747 Magnolia Blvd. in North Hollywood. Performances are Fridays at 8pm; Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 2pm. Ticket prices are $34; Students and Seniors are $17.50; Previews are $15.00. Special group rates available for parties of 8 or more. For tickets, please call 818-761-8838 or visit www.RoadTheatre.org to purchase tickets online or to view complete schedule.

Reviews

Vaulting back and forth in time, Ziegler's memory play is both elegy and cautionary tale, imbued with poignant loss and keen regret. Under Andre Barron's sensitive and appropriately delicate direction, Perrault and Orazio are superb. However, it is Zuckerman's tour-de-force turn — twitchy, manic, comical and anguished — that dazzles.

sweet - F. Kathleen Foley - LA Times - ...read full review


Road Theatre's snazzy production of Anna Ziegler's A Delicate Ship dazzles even before the play begins. With incisive patterning of present with past, Zeigler interweaves a pivotal Christmas Eve into a braid of relationships suddenly gone awry. Sarah's (Paris Perrault) relationship with upright Sam (Philip Orazio) seems on track. But her long-time friend, Nate (Josh Zuckerman) arrives to throw a monkey wrench into their idyllic evening. A Delicate Ship keeps sailing through March 24th

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - Show Mag - ...read full review


If you are the type of person who would enjoy sitting through a vicious harangue for a couple of hours, then "A Delicate Ship" is the play for you. The story is set in Brooklyn. It's Christmas Eve and Sarah (Paris Perrault) and Nate (Josh Zuckerman) are spending a quiet evening in her apartment. They are interrupted suddenly, however, by a fierce pounding on the door and a boisterous young man, Sam (Philip Orazio), who bursts into the room and, ignoring Nate completely, begins a rambling, intimate conversation with Sarah. Sam is brash and confrontational. Sarah is confused. Nate is conflicted. Who is this raucous intruder? Sam begins to woo her with happy memories of their time together. She objects and argues with him, but can't help being mesmerized by his vociferous assertiveness. And meanwhile Nate stands by awkwardly, trying to blend into the woodwork.

sour - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


This play is unusual in its way of looking at love, memories, and decisions that change lives. It is well directed by Andre Barron with a most capable cast.

sweet - Carol Kaufman Segal - ...read full review


Heavy-handed teasing makes the play's ending inevitable and predictable. The story might be better serviced if Ziegler focused only on telling a linear story of the one eventful night...potentially meaningful moments grow frustrating, and opportunities for more depth in the character dynamics are never fully seized.

sweet-sour - Erin Conley - On Stage and Screen - ...read full review


Zuckerman's Nate commands the stage with the kind of ostentatiously dazzling performance that is rare in contemporary plays. He swaggers, bellows, cajoles, intimidates, and seduces. One is equally astonished and appalled by him. Perrault and Orazio do their best to make sense of why Sarah and Sam don't toss Nate back out into the snowy night. But eventually they content themselves with standing by and watching hurricane Nate self-destruct.

sweet-sour - Michael Van Duzer - ShowMag - ...read full review


Director Andre Barron has fashioned a skillful and sensitive production, and his actors inhabit it nicely.

sweet - Neal Weaver - Stage Raw - ...read full review


A Delicate Ship grabbed me straight away and never let go. It moved me, it touched me, it broke my heart. What more can a reviewer wish for?

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


If you lose your way trying to navigate the enigmatic journey Anna Ziegler wants to take us in her well-written but thematically dense A Delicate Ship, keep your eye on Josh Zuckerman – it'll be impossible not to – because he has found the human trajectory that Nate, one of the three-hander's three protagonists, is on and has wormed his way into the character with such determined intricacy that not only will you find it impossible to separate the actor from the man, but you are almost certain to identify with his desperation and loss, despite Nate's brash, borderline personality.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


The west coast premiere of playwright Anna Ziegler's A DELICATE SHIP receives a sturdy launching by The Road Theatre Company. Josh Zuckerman's frenetic energy imbues this interloper with such intensity, one easily gets caught up in his storytelling of his and Sarah's teen years growing up together (Truths? Disillusions?) Bravo to director Andre Barron and Zuckerman for keeping the character of Nate as charming for as long as Zuckerman does, before inevitably becoming annoying and obsessive.

sweet - Gil Kaan - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Ziegler has written an interesting take on the memory play format with all three characters sharing memories, some from the future as well as the past. However there is a big problem in Ziegler's script, which at 80 minutes is nearly twice as long as it needs to be for the situation she has created. Nate is such an unpleasant character you don't want to spend that much time in his company

sweet-sour - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Vaulting back and forth in time, Ziegler's memory play is both elegy and cautionary tale, imbued with poignant loss and keen regret. Under Andre Barron's sensitive and appropriately delicate direction, Perrault and Orazio are superb. However, it is Zuckerman's tour-de-force turn — twitchy, manic, comical and anguished — that dazzles.

sweet - F. Kathleen Foley - LA Times - ...read full review


Road Theatre's snazzy production of Anna Ziegler's A Delicate Ship dazzles even before the play begins. With incisive patterning of present with past, Zeigler interweaves a pivotal Christmas Eve into a braid of relationships suddenly gone awry. Sarah's (Paris Perrault) relationship with upright Sam (Philip Orazio) seems on track. But her long-time friend, Nate (Josh Zuckerman) arrives to throw a monkey wrench into their idyllic evening. A Delicate Ship keeps sailing through March 24th

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - Show Mag - ...read full review


If you are the type of person who would enjoy sitting through a vicious harangue for a couple of hours, then "A Delicate Ship" is the play for you. The story is set in Brooklyn. It's Christmas Eve and Sarah (Paris Perrault) and Nate (Josh Zuckerman) are spending a quiet evening in her apartment. They are interrupted suddenly, however, by a fierce pounding on the door and a boisterous young man, Sam (Philip Orazio), who bursts into the room and, ignoring Nate completely, begins a rambling, intimate conversation with Sarah. Sam is brash and confrontational. Sarah is confused. Nate is conflicted. Who is this raucous intruder? Sam begins to woo her with happy memories of their time together. She objects and argues with him, but can't help being mesmerized by his vociferous assertiveness. And meanwhile Nate stands by awkwardly, trying to blend into the woodwork.

sour - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


This play is unusual in its way of looking at love, memories, and decisions that change lives. It is well directed by Andre Barron with a most capable cast.

sweet - Carol Kaufman Segal - ...read full review


Heavy-handed teasing makes the play's ending inevitable and predictable. The story might be better serviced if Ziegler focused only on telling a linear story of the one eventful night...potentially meaningful moments grow frustrating, and opportunities for more depth in the character dynamics are never fully seized.

sweet-sour - Erin Conley - On Stage and Screen - ...read full review


Zuckerman's Nate commands the stage with the kind of ostentatiously dazzling performance that is rare in contemporary plays. He swaggers, bellows, cajoles, intimidates, and seduces. One is equally astonished and appalled by him. Perrault and Orazio do their best to make sense of why Sarah and Sam don't toss Nate back out into the snowy night. But eventually they content themselves with standing by and watching hurricane Nate self-destruct.

sweet-sour - Michael Van Duzer - ShowMag - ...read full review


Director Andre Barron has fashioned a skillful and sensitive production, and his actors inhabit it nicely.

sweet - Neal Weaver - Stage Raw - ...read full review


A Delicate Ship grabbed me straight away and never let go. It moved me, it touched me, it broke my heart. What more can a reviewer wish for?

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


If you lose your way trying to navigate the enigmatic journey Anna Ziegler wants to take us in her well-written but thematically dense A Delicate Ship, keep your eye on Josh Zuckerman – it'll be impossible not to – because he has found the human trajectory that Nate, one of the three-hander's three protagonists, is on and has wormed his way into the character with such determined intricacy that not only will you find it impossible to separate the actor from the man, but you are almost certain to identify with his desperation and loss, despite Nate's brash, borderline personality.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


The west coast premiere of playwright Anna Ziegler's A DELICATE SHIP receives a sturdy launching by The Road Theatre Company. Josh Zuckerman's frenetic energy imbues this interloper with such intensity, one easily gets caught up in his storytelling of his and Sarah's teen years growing up together (Truths? Disillusions?) Bravo to director Andre Barron and Zuckerman for keeping the character of Nate as charming for as long as Zuckerman does, before inevitably becoming annoying and obsessive.

sweet - Gil Kaan - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Ziegler has written an interesting take on the memory play format with all three characters sharing memories, some from the future as well as the past. However there is a big problem in Ziegler's script, which at 80 minutes is nearly twice as long as it needs to be for the situation she has created. Nate is such an unpleasant character you don't want to spend that much time in his company

sweet-sour - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review